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Programming language: Java
License: Apache License 2.0
Tags: Configuration     Projects    
Latest version: v4.3.0

microconfig alternatives and similar libraries

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README

Quick start

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We recommend to start with Microconfig Features guide and then continue reading this documentation.

Microconfig overview and features

Microconfig is intended to make it easy and convenient to manage configuration for microservices (or just for a big amount of services) and reuse the common part.

If your project consists of tens or hundreds of services you have to:

  • Keep the configuration for each service ideally separate from the code.
  • The configuration for different services can have common and specific parts. Also, the configuration for the same service in different environments can have common and specific parts.
  • A common part for different services (or for one service in different environments) should not be copied and pasted and must be easy to reuse.
  • It must be easy to understand how the resulting configuration is generated and based on which values the config placeholders are resolved.
  • Some configuration properties must be dynamic, calculated using an expression language.

Microconfig is written in Java, but it's designed to be used with systems written in any language. Microconfig just describes a format of configuration sources, syntax for placeholders, includes, excludes, overrides, an expression language for dynamic properties and an engine that can transform the config sources into simple *.yaml or *.properties files. Also it can resolve placeholders in arbitrary template files and show differences between config releases.

Compared to config servers (like Consul, Zookeeper, Spring Cloud Config):

Config servers solve the problem of dynamic distribution of configuration in runtime (can use http endpoints), but to distribute configuration you have to store it, ideally with changes in history and without duplication of common parts.

Compared to Ansible:

Ansible is a powerful, but much too general, engine for deployment management and doesn't provide a common and clean way to store configuration for microservices, and a lot of teams have to invent their own solutions based on Ansible.

Microconfig does one thing and does it well. It provides an approach, best practices for how to keep configuration for a big amount of services, and an engine to build config sources into result files.

You can use Microconfig together with any config servers and deployment frameworks. Configuration can be built during the deployment phase and the resulting plain config files can be copied to the filesystem, where your services can access them directly (for instance, Spring Boot can read configuration from *.yaml or *.properties), or you can distribute the resulting configuration using any config servers. Also, you can store not only application configuration but configuration used to run your services, and your deployment framework can read that configuration from Microconfig to start your services with the right parameters and settings.

Where to store the configuration

It’s a good practice to keep service configuration separate from code. It doesn't require you to rebuild services every time the configuration is changed and allows you to use the same service artefacts (for instance, *.jar) for all environments because it doesn’t contain any environment specific configuration. The configuration can be updated even in runtime without service source code changes.

The best way to follow this principle is to have a dedicated repository for configuration in your favorite version control system. You can store configuration for all microservices in the same repository to make it easy to reuse a common part and be sure the common part is consistent for all your services.

Service configuration types

It's convenient to have different kinds of configuration and keep it in different files:

  • Deploy configuration (the configuration used by deployment tools that describes where/how to deploy your service, like artifact repository settings, container params).
  • Process configuration (the configuration used by deployment tools to start your service with right params, like memory limits, VM params, etc.).
  • Application configuration (the configuration that your service reads after start-up and uses in runtime).
  • Environment variables.
  • Secret configuration (note, you should not store in a VCS any sensitive information, like passwords. In a VCS you can store references(keys) to passwords, and keep passwords in special secured stores(like Vault) or at least in encrypted files on environment machines).
  • Library specific templates (for instance, Dockerfile, kafka.conf, cassandra.yaml, some scripts to run before/after your service start-up, etc.)

Microconfig detects the configuration type by the config file extension. The default configuration for config types:

  • *.yaml or *.properties for the application configuration.
  • *.proc or *.process for the process configuration.
  • *.deploy for the deployment configuration.
  • *.env for environment variables.
  • *.secret for the secret configuration.
  • For static files - see the 'Templates files' section.

You can use all the configuration types or only some of them. Also you can override the default extensions or define your own config types.

Basic folder layout

Let’s take a look at a basic folder layout that you can keep in a dedicated repository.

For every service, you have to create a folder with a unique name(the name of the service). In the service directory, we will keep common and environment specific configurations.

So, let’s imagine we have 4 microservices: 'orders', 'payments', 'service-discovery', and 'api-gateway'. For convenience, we can group services by layers: 'infra' for infrastructure services and 'core' for our business domain services. The resulting layout will look like:

repo
└───core  
│   └───orders
│   └───payments
│ 
└───infra
    └───service-discovery
    └───api-gateway

Configuration sources

Inside the service folder, you can create a configuration in key=value format. For the following examples, we will prefer using *.yaml, but Microconfig also supports *.properties.

Let’s create the basic application and process configuration files for each service. You can split configuration among several files, but for simplicity, we will create application.yaml and process.proc for each service. No matter how many base files are used, after the configuration build for each service and each config type, a single result file will be generated.

repo
└───core  
│    └───orders
│    │   └───application.yaml
│    │   └───process.proc
│    └───payments
│        └───application.yaml
│        └───process.proc
│ 
└───infra
    └───service-discovery
    │   └───application.yaml
    │   └───process.proc
    └───api-gateway
        └───application.yaml
        └───process.proc

Inside process.proc we will store configuration that describes what your service is, and how to run it (your config files can have other properties, so don't pay attention to concrete values).

orders/process.proc

artifact=org.example:orders:19.4.2 # partial duplication
java.main=org.example.orders.OrdersStarter
java.opts.mem=-Xms1024M -Xmx2048M -XX:+UseG1GC -XX:+PrintGCDetails -Xloggc:logs/gc.log # duplication

payments/process.proc

artifact=org.example:payments:19.4.2 # partial duplication
java.main=org.example.payments.PaymentStarter
java.opts.mem=-Xms1024M -Xmx2048M -XX:+UseG1GC -XX:+PrintGCDetails -Xloggc:logs/gc.log # duplication
instance.count=2

service-discovery/process.proc

artifact=org.example.discovery:eureka:19.4.2 # partial duplication 
java.main=org.example.discovery.EurekaStarter
java.opts.mem=-Xms1024M -Xmx2048M # partial duplication 

As you can see we already have some small duplication (all services have '19.4.2' version, and two of them have the same java.ops params). Configuration duplication is as bad as code duplication. We will see later how to do this in a better way.

Let's see what application properties look like. In the comments we note what can be improved.

orders/application.yaml

server.port: 9000
application.name: orders # better to get name from folder
orders.personalRecommendation: true
statistics.enableExtendedStatistics: true
service-discovery.url: http://10.12.172.11:6781 # are you sure url is consistent with SD configuration?
eureka.instance.prefer-ip-address: true  # duplication
datasource:
  minimum-pool-size: 2  # duplication
  maximum-pool-size: 10
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.31:1521:ARMSDEV  # partial duplication
jpa.properties.hibernate.id.optimizer.pooled.prefer_lo: true  # duplication

payments/application.yaml

server.port: 8080
application.name: payments # better to get name from folder
payments:
  bookTimeoutInMs: 900000 # difficult to read. How long in minutes?
  system.retries: 3
consistency.validateConsistencyIntervalInMs: 420000 # difficult to read. How long in minutes?
service-discovery.url: http://10.12.172.11:6781 # are you sure url is consistent with eureka configuration?
eureka.instance.prefer-ip-address: true  # duplication
datasource:
  minimum-pool-size: 2  # duplication
  maximum-pool-size: 5
datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.127:1521:ARMSDEV  # partial duplication
jpa.properties.hibernate.id.optimizer.pooled.prefer_lo: true # duplication

service-discovery/application.yaml

server.port: 6781
application.name: eureka
eureka:
  client.fetchRegistry: false
  server:
    eviction-interval-timer-in-ms: 15000 # difficult to read
    enable-self-preservation: false    

The first bad thing - application files contain duplication. Also, you have to spend some time to understand the application’s dependencies or its structure. For instance, payment-service contains settings for:

  • service-discovery client
  • oracle db
  • application specific

Of course, you can separate a group of settings by an empty line. But we can make it more readable and understandable.

Better config structure using #include

Our services have a common configuration for service-discovery and database. To make it easy to understand the service's dependencies, let’s create folders for service-discovery-client and oracle-client and specify links to these dependencies from the core services.

repo
└───common
|   └───service-discovery-client 
|   |   └───application.yaml
|   └───oracle-client
|       └───application.yaml
|   
└───core  
│   └───orders
│   │   ***
│   └───payments
│       ***
│ 
└───infra
    └───service-discovery
    │   ***
    └───api-gateway
        ***

service-discovery-client/application.yaml

service-discovery.url: http://10.12.172.11:6781 # are you sure url is consistent with eureka configuration?
eureka.instance.prefer-ip-address: true 

oracle-client/application.yaml

datasource:
  minimum-pool-size: 2  
  maximum-pool-size: 5
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.31:1521:ARMSDEV  
jpa.properties.hibernate.id.optimizer.pooled.prefer_lo: true

And replace explicit configs with includes

orders/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client, oracle-db-client

server.port: 9000
application.name: orders # better to get name from folder
orders.personalRecommendation: true
statistics.enableExtendedStatistics: true

payments/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client, oracle-db-client

server.port: 8080
application.name: payments # better to get name from folder
consistency.validateConsistencyIntervalInMs: 420000 # difficult to read. How long in minutes?
payments:
  bookTimeoutInMs: 900000 # how long in minutes?
  system.retries: 3

To include a component's configuration you need to specify only the component name, you don't need to specify its path. This makes the config layout refactoring easier. Microconfig will find a folder with the component's name and include the configuration from its files (if the folder name is not unique, Microconfig includes configs from each folder, but it's a good idea to keep a component name unique).

Some problems still here, but we removed the duplication and made it easier to understand the service's dependencies.

You can override any properties from your dependencies. Let's override the order's connection pool size.

orders/application.yaml

#include oracle-db-client

datasource.maximum-pool-size: 10
***

Nice. But order-service has a small part of its db configuration(pool-size), it's not that bad, but we can make the config semantically better. Also you can see that order and payment services have a different ip for oracle.

order: datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.31:1521:ARMSDEV
payment: datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.127:1521:ARMSDEV
And oracle-client contains settings for .31.

Of course, you can override datasource.url in the payment/application.yaml. But this overridden property will contain a copy of another part of jdbc url and you will get all the standard 'copy-and-paste' problems. We would like to override only a part of the property.

Also it's better to create a dedicated configuration for order db and payment db. Both db configuration will include common-db config and override the 'ip' part of url. After that, we will migrate 'datasource.maximum-pool-size' from order-service to order-db, so order-service will contain only links to its dependencies and service-specific configs.

Let’s refactor.

repo
└───common
|   └───oracle
|       └───oracle-common
|       |   └───application.yaml
|       └───order-db
|       |   └───application.yaml
|       └───payment-db
|           └───application.yaml

oracle-common/application.yaml

datasource:
  minimum-pool-size: 2  
  maximum-pool-size: 5    
connection.timeoutInMs: 300000
jpa.properties.hibernate.id.optimizer.pooled.prefer_lo: true

orders-db/application.yaml

#include oracle-common

datasource:
  maximum-pool-size: 10
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.31:1521:ARMSDEV #partial duplication

payment-db/application.yaml

#include oracle-common

datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.127:1521:ARMSDEV #partial duplication

orders/application.yaml

#include order-db
***

payments/application.yaml

#include payment-db

Includes can be in one line or on different lines:

#include service-discovery-client
#include oracle-db-client, monitoring    

Placeholders

Instead of duplicating the value of some properties, Microconfig allows you to have a link (placeholder) to this value.

Let's refactor the service-discovery-client config.

Initial:

service-discovery-client/application.yaml

service-discovery.url: http://10.12.172.11:6781 # are you sure host and port are consistent with SD configuration? 

service-discovery/application.yaml

server.port: 6761 

Refactored:

service-discovery-client/application.yaml

service-discovery.url: http://${[email protected]}:${[email protected]}

service-discovery/application.yaml

server.port: 6761
ip: 10.12.172.11 

So if you change the service-discovery port, all dependent services will get this update.

Microconfig has another approach to store service's ip. We will discuss it later. For now, it's better to set the 'ip' property in the service-discovery config file.

The Microconfig syntax for placeholders: ${[email protected]}. Microconfig forces you to specify the component name. This syntax is better than just a property name (like ${connectionSize}), because it makes it obvious where to find the original placeholder value.

Let's refactor oracle db config using placeholders and environment specific overrides.

Initial:

oracle-common/application.yaml

datasource:
  maximum-pool-size: 10
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@172.30.162.31:1521:ARMSDEV 

Refactored:

oracle-common/application.yaml

datasource:
  maximum-pool-size: 10
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@${[email protected]}:1521:${[email protected]}
oracle:
  host: 172.30.162.20
  sid: ARMSDEV

oracle-common/application.uat.yaml

oracle.host: 172.30.162.80

oracle-common/application.prod.yaml

oracle:
  host: 10.17.14.18
  sid: ARMSPROD

As you can see using placeholders we can override not only the whole property but also part of it.

A placeholder can link to another placeholder. Microconfig can resolve them recursively and detect cyclic dependencies.

Temp properties

If you want to declare temp properties that will be used by placeholders only and you don't want them to be included in the result config file, you can declare them with #var keyword.

oracle-common/application.yaml

datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@${[email protected]}:1521:${[email protected]}
#var oracle.host: 172.30.162.20
#var oracle.sid: ARMSDEV

oracle-common/application.uat.yaml

#var oracle.host: 172.30.162.80

This approach works with includes as well. You can #include oracle-common and then override 'oracle.host', and 'datasource.url' will be resolved based on the overridden value.

In the example below after the build process: datasource.url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@100.30.162.80:1521:ARMSDEV

orders-db/application.dev.yaml

#include oracle-common

#var oracle.host: 100.30.162.80         

Removing base properties

Using #var you can remove properties from the result config file. You can include some config and override any property with #var to exclude it from the result config file.

Let's remove 'payments.system.retries' property for 'dev' environment:

db-client/application.yaml

datasource:
  minimum-pool-size: 2  
  maximum-pool-size: 5

payments/application.yaml

#include db-client
#var datasource.minimum-pool-size:  // will not be included into result config       

Placeholder's default value

You can specify a default value for a placeholder using the following syntax: ${[email protected]:defaultValue}

Let's set a default value for 'oracle host'

oracle-common/application.yaml

datasource:
  maximum-pool-size: 10
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@${[email protected]:172.30.162.20}:1521:${[email protected]}
#var oracle.sid: ARMSDEV

Note, a default value can be a placeholder: ${[email protected]:${[email protected]:Missing value}}

In the example Microconfig will try to:

If a placeholder doesn't have a default value and that placeholder can't be resolved, Microconfig throws an exception with the detailed problem description.

Specials placeholders

As we discussed the syntax for placeholders looks like ${[email protected]}. Microconfig has several special useful placeholders:

There are some other environment descriptor related properties, we will discuss them later:

Note, if you use a special placeholder with ${[email protected]} then the value will be context dependent. Let's apply ${[email protected]} to see why it's useful.

Initial:

orders/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

application.name: orders

payments/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

application.name: payments

Refactored:

orders/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

payments/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

service-discovery-client/application.yaml

application.name: ${[email protected]}

Environment variables and system properties

To resolve environment variables use the following syntax: ${[email protected]}

For example:

 ${[email protected]}
 ${[email protected]_HOME}
 ${[email protected]_OF_PROCESSORS}

To resolve Java system variables (System::getProperty) use the following syntax: ${[email protected]}

Some useful standard system variables:

 ${[email protected]}
 ${[email protected]}
 ${[email protected]}

You can pass your own system properties during Microconfig start with -D prefix (See 'Running config build' section)

Example:

 -DtaskId=3456 -DsomeParam3=value

Then you can access it: ${[email protected]} or ${[email protected]}

Placeholders to another config type

As we discussed Microconfig supports different config types and detects the type by file extensions. Microconfig resolves placeholders based on properties of the same config type only.

Let’s see the example how it works:

‘orders’ has ‘service.port’ property in application.yaml, so you can declare a placeholder to this property from application config types only (*.yaml or *.properties). If you declare that placeholder in, for example, *.process files, Microconfig will not resolve it and throw an exception.

someComponent/application.yaml

orderPort: ${[email protected]} # works

someComponent/application.process

orderPort: ${[email protected]} # doesn’t work

If you need to declare a placeholder to a property from another config type you have to specify the config type using the following syntax: ${configType::[email protected]}.

For our example the correct syntax:

someComponent/application.process

orderPort: ${app::[email protected]}

Microconfig default config types:

  • app – for *.yaml or *.properties
  • process – for *.proc or *.process
  • deploy – for *.deploy
  • secret – for *.secret
  • env – for *.env

Expression language

Microconfig supports math expressions, conditions and Java String API.

Let's see some examples:

#Better than 300000
connection.timeoutInMs: #{5 * 60 * 1000}

#Microconfig placeholder and simple math
datasource.maximum-pool-size: #{${[email protected]} + 10} 

#Using placeholder and Java String API
mainClassNameWithoutPackage: #{'${[email protected]}'.substring('${[email protected]}'.lastIndexOf('.') + 1)}

month: #{'${[email protected]}'.split('-')[1]}

#Condition
releaseType: #{'${[email protected]}'.endsWith('-SNAPSHOT') ? 'snapshot' : 'release'}

Environment specific properties

Microconfig allows specifying environment specific properties (add/remove/override). For instance, you want to increase the connection-pool-size for dbs and increase the amount of memory for prod env. To add/remove/override properties for the environment, you can create application.${ENVNAME}.yaml file in the config folder.

Let's override connection pool size for 'dev' and 'prod' and add one new param for 'dev'.

order-db
└───application.yaml
└───application.dev.yaml
└───application.prod.yaml

orders-db/application.dev.yaml

datasource.maximum-pool-size: 15   
hibernate.show-sql: true

orders-db/application.prod.yaml

datasource.maximum-pool-size: 50

Also, you can declare common properties for several environments in a single file. You can use the following filename pattern: application.${ENV1.ENV2.ENV3...}.yaml

Let's create common properties for dev, dev2 and test environments.

order-db
└───application.yaml
└───application.dev.yaml
└───application.dev.dev2.test.yaml
└───application.prod.yaml

orders-db/application.dev.dev2.test.yaml

hibernate.show-sql: true

When you build config for a specific environment (for example 'dev') Microconfig will collect properties from:

  • application.yaml
  • then add/override properties from application.dev.{anotherEnv}.yaml.
  • then add/override properties from application.dev.yaml.

Profiles and explicit environment names for includes and placeholders

As we discussed you can create environment specific properties using the filename pattern: application.${ENV}.yaml. You can use the same approach for creating profile specific properties.

For example, you can create a folder for http client timeout settings:

timeout-settings/application.yaml

timeouts:
  connectTimeoutMs: 1000
  readTimeoutMs: 5000

And some services can include this configuration:

orders/application.yaml

#include timeout-settings

payments/application.yaml

#include timeout-settings

But what if you want some services to be configured with a long timeout? Instead of the environment you can use the profile name in the filename:

timeout-settings
└───application.yaml
└───application.long.yaml
└───application.huge.yaml

timeout-settings/application.long.yaml

timeouts.readTimeoutMs: 30000

timeout-settings/application.huge.yaml

timeouts.readTimeoutMs: 600000

And specify the profile name with include:

payments/application.yaml

#include timeout-settings[long]

You can use the profile/environment name with placeholders as well:

${timeout-settings[long]@readTimeoutMs}
${kafka[test]@bootstrap-servers}

The difference between environment specific files and profiles is only logic. Microconfig handles it in the same way.

Template files

Microconfig allows you to keep configuration files for any libraries in their specific format and resolve placeholders inside them. For example, you want to keep logback.xml (or some other descriptor for your log library) and reuse this file with resolved placeholders for all your services.

Let's create this file:

repo
└───common
|    └───logback-template 
|         └───logback.xml

logback-template/logback.xml

<configuration>
    <appender class="ch.qos.logback.core.FileAppender">
        <file>logs/${[email protected]}.log</file>
            <encoder>
                <pattern>%d [%thread] %highlight(%-5level) %cyan(%logger{15}) %msg %n</pattern>
            </encoder>
    </appender>    
</configuration>

So we want every service to have its own logback.xml with resolved ${application.name}. Let's configure the order and payment services to use this template.

orders/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

mc.template.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml # full path to logback.xml, @configDir - special placeholder property

payments/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client

mc.template.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml

It's better to extract the common property mc.template.logback.fromFile to logback-template/application.yaml and then use #include.

repo
└───common
|   └───logback-template 
|   └───logback.xml
|   └───application.yaml

logback-template/application.yaml

mc.template.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml

orders/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client, logback-template

payments/application.yaml

#include service-discovery-client, logback-template

As we saw in the above text the order and payment services include the application.name property from service-discovery-client. During the config build Microconfig will replace ${application.name} inside logback.xml with the service's property value and copy the resulting file 'logback.xml' to the relevant folder for each service.

If you want to declare a property for a template only and don't want this property to be included into the result config file you can use #var keyword.

If you want to override the template destination filename you can use mc.template.${templateName}.toFile=${someFile} property. For example:

logback-template/application.yaml

 mc.template.logback:
   fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml
   toFile: logs/logback-descriptor.xml

You can use the absolute or the relative path for toFile property. The relative path starts from the resulting service config dir (see 'Running config build' section).

So the template dependency declaration syntax looks like:

mc.template.${templateName}:
  fromFile: ${sourceTemplateFile}
  toFile: ${resolvedTemplateDestinationFile}

${templateName} - is used only for mapping fromFile and toFile properties.

Also, you can use a short one line syntax using ->

 mc.template.${templateName}: ${sourceTemplateFile} -> ${resolvedTemplateDestinationFile}

Using arrow notation you can also resolve directories with templates. This will resolve all files inside ${sourceTemplateDir}. Source filename is used as target filename.

 mc.template.${templateName}: ${sourceTemplateDir}/* -> ${resolvedTemplateDestinationDir}

Or create multiple templates with different ${templateName} from a single template file. Note the usage of ${templateName} placeholder inside target filename to create different files based on template name.

 mc.template.[${templateName1},${templateName2}]: ${sourceTemplateFile} -> ${resolvedTemplateDestinationDir}/targetName-${templateName}.xml

Let's override the file that will be copied on the prod environment:

repo
└───common
|   └───logback-template 
|       └───logback.xml
|       └───logback-prod.xml
|       └───application.yaml
|       └───application.prod.yaml

logback-template/application.prod.yaml

mc.template.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback-prod.xml

Mustache template engine support

If resolving placeholders inside templates is not enough for you, you can use Mustache template engine. With Mustache you can use loops, conditions and includes.

Let's imagine we want to configure different Logback appenders on different environments. We can use condition 'appender.rolling' and override this value on different environments.

{{#appender.rolling}}
    <appender name="FILE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.RollingFileAppender">
        <file>logs/${[email protected]}.log</file>
        <rollingPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeAndTimeBasedRollingPolicy">
            <fileNamePattern>logs/${[email protected]}.%d{yyyy-MM-dd}.%i.log</fileNamePattern>
            <maxFileSize>20MB</maxFileSize>
            <maxHistory>30</maxHistory>
            <totalSizeCap>1GB</totalSizeCap>
        </rollingPolicy>
    </appender>
{{/appender.rolling}}
{{^appender.rolling}}
    <appender name="FILE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.FileAppender">
        <file>logs/${[email protected]}.log</file>
    </appender>
{{/appender.rolling}}

logback-template/application.yaml

mc.mustache.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml
#var appender.rolling: true

logback-template/application.test.yaml

#var appender.rolling: false

Microconfig uses Mustache if the template declaration starts with mc.mustache prefix:

mc.mustache.logback.fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.xml

or the template file has *.mustache extension:

mc.template.logback:
  fromFile: ${[email protected]}/logback.mustache
  toFile: logger.xml

or the short version

mc.template.logback: ${[email protected]}/logback.mustache -> logger.xml

Environment descriptor

As we discussed every service can have default and environment-specific configurations, also we can extract a common configuration to some components. During the build phase we want to build configs for a subset of our components, only for real services on a concrete environment. Of course, you can pass the environment name and the list of service names as parameters to build the configuration. But this is not very convenient if you want to build configuration for a large number of services.

So Microconfig allows specifying a list of service names on a special environment descriptor and then use only the environment name to build configs for all services listed on that descriptor.

Environments descriptors must be in ${configRoot}/envs folder.

repo
└───components
|   └───***   
└───envs
    └───base.yaml
    └───dev.yaml
    └───test.yaml
    └───prod.yaml

Let's see the environment descriptor format:

envs/base.yaml

orders:  
  components:  
    - order-db-patcher
    - orders
    - order-ui

payments:
  components:
    - payment-db-patcher
    - payments
    - payment-ui

infra:
  components: 
    - service-discovery
    - api-gateway
    - ssl-api-gateway

monitoring:
  components:
    - grafana
    - prometheus    

environment name = filename

orders: # component group name
  components:  
    - order-db-patcher # component name(folder)
    - orders # component name
    - order-ui # component name

One environment can include another one and add/remove/override component groups:

envs/test.yaml

include: # include all groups from 'base' environment except 'monitoring'
  env: base
  exclude:
   - monitoring

infra:
  exclude:
    - ssl-api-gateway # excluded ssl-api-gateway component from 'infra' group  
  append:
    - local-proxy # added new component into 'infra' group

tests_dashboard: # added new component group 'tests_dashboard'
  components:
    - test-statistic-collector

You can use the optional param ip for the environment or component groups and then use it via ${[email protected]}.

For instance, ${[email protected]} will be resolved to 12.53.12.67, ${[email protected]} will be resolved to 170.53.12.80.

ip: 170.53.12.80 # default ip

orders:  
  ip: 12.53.12.67 # ip overridden for the group
  components:  
    - order-db-patcher
    - orders
    - order-ui

payments:  
  components:
    - payment-db-patcher
    - payments
    - payment-ui    

Consider configuring your deployment tool to read the environment descriptor to know which services to deploy.

Running the config build

As we discussed Microconfig has its own format for configuration sources. During the config build Microconfig inlines all includes, resolves placeholders, evaluates expression language, copies templates, and stores the result values into plain *.yaml or *.properties files to a dedicated folder for each service.

To run the build you can download Microconfig release from https://github.com/microconfig/microconfig/releases.

The required build params:

  • -r - full or relative config root dir.
  • -e - environment name (environment is used as a config profile, also as a group of services to build configs).

Optional build params:

  • -d - full or relative build destination dir. Default = ${currentFolder}/build
  • -stacktrace - Show full stacktrace in case of exceptions. Values: true/false. Default: false

To build configs not for the whole environment but only for specific services you can use the following optional params:

  • -g - a comma-separated list of component groups to build configs.
  • -s - a comma-separated list of services to build configs.

Command line params example (Java 8+ required):

java -jar microconfig.jar -r repo -e prod

To add system properties use -D

java -DtaskId=3456 -DsomeParam=value -jar microconfig.jar -r repo -d configs -e prod

To speed up the build up to 3 times you can add -XX:TieredStopAtLevel=1 Java VM param. For binary compiled distribution of MC(Mac, Linux, Win) you don't need XX:TieredStopAtLevel, it works ~5 times faster than jar version(cause we don't spend time in runtime to compile the code, but the peak performance is the same) Although the build time for even big projects with hundreds of services is about 1-3 seconds.

java -XX:TieredStopAtLevel=1 -jar microconfig.jar -r repo -e prod

Let's see examples of initial and destination folder layouts:

Initial source layout:

repo
└───common
|   └───logback-template 
|       └───logback.xml
└───core  
│   └───orders
│   │   └───application.yaml
│   │   └───process.proc
│   └───payments
│       └───application.yaml
│       └───process.proc
│ 
└───infra
    └───service-discovery
    │   └───application.yaml
    │   └───process.proc
    └───api-gateway
        └───application.yaml
        └───process.proc

After build:

configs
└───orders
│   └───application.yaml
│   └───process.yaml
|   └───logback.xml
└───payments
│   └───application.yaml
│   └───process.yaml
|   └───logback.xml
└───service-discovery
│   └───application.yaml
│   └───process.yaml
|   └───logback.xml
└───api-gateway
    └───application.yaml
    └───process.yaml
    └───logback.xml

You can try to build configs from the dedicated example repo: https://github.com/microconfig/microconfig-quickstart

Viewing differences between config versions

During the config build, Microconfig compares newly generated files to files generated during the previous build for each service for each config type. Microconfig can detect added/removed/changed properties.

Diff for application.yaml is stored in diff-application.yaml, diff for process.yaml is stored in diff-process.yaml, etc.

configs
└───orders
│   └───application.yaml
│   └───diff-application.yaml
│   └───process.yaml
│   └───diff-process.yaml
│   └───logback.xml

The Diff format:

diff-application.yaml

+security.client.protocol: SSL # property has been added
-connection.timeoutMs: 1000 # property has been removed
 server.max-threads: 10 -> 35 # value has been changed from '10' to '35'

YAML and Properties format support

Microconfig supports *.yaml and *.properties format for source and result configs. You can keep a part of configuration in *.yaml files and another part in *.properties.

repo
└───core  
│   └───orders
│   │   └───application.yaml
│   │   └───process.proc
│   └───payments
│       └───application.properties
│       └───process.proc

Yaml configs can have nested properties:

datasource:  
  minimum-pool-size: 2  
  maximum-pool-size: 5    
  timeout:
    ms: 10

and lists:

cluster.gateway:
  hosts:
    - 10.20.30.47
    - 15.20.30.47

Yaml format configs will be built into *.yaml, property configs will be built into *.properties. If *.properties configs include *.yaml configs, the resulting file will be *.yaml. Microconfig can detect the format based on separators (if a config file has extension neither *.yaml nor *.properties). If you use : key-value separator, Microconfig will handle it like *.yaml (= for *.properties).

Intellij IDEA plugin

To make configuration management a little bit easier you can use Microconfig Intellij IDEA plugin. The plugin can navigate to #include and placeholders' sources, show hints with resolved placeholders, and build configs from IDE.

See the documentation here: https://github.com/microconfig/microconfig-idea-plugin

Contributing

If you want to contribute to the project and make it better, your help is very welcome. You can request a feature or submit a bug via issues. Or submit a pull request.

Contributing to the documentation is very welcome too.

Your Github 'Star' is appreciated!

https://github.com/microconfig/microconfig

Contacts

Join our Slack!

[email protected]


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the microconfig README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.